Spring Collection 2018

Made of barnwood and heavily inspired by the craftsman movement Spring Collection 2018 is comprised of 15 individual pieces, in 3 sets.
Side table, bench, plant stand, end table, tiny table. Wood types include Red Oak, Cedar, tipanu, and Douglas Fir.

 Art Show.This will be my third complete collection of Furniture.
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Large Slab Tables.

Whether in a large Dining Room, Conference Room or Patio. A large solid wood slab table makes a big statement.

Elegant and graceful this table commands attention. It graces the dining room of a Model Home in Clarkdale, Arizona and can be Viewed at Vineyards on 89A.

Pizza Maker
We have a picnic Table

At twelve feet long this amazing Himalayan Ceder beauty comfortably seats 10 hungry pizza fans…And Carson Wheeler of Grand avenue Pizza never disappoints. (Visit this table @ http://www.grandavenuepizzacompany.com/)

 

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Like a Boss

Want the “Home court advantage? Invite your clients to sit at this beauty. At four feet by almost ten feet this Colibah and Arizona Ash Beauty commands respect. While the geometry exhibits style and sophistication.

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At a little over twelve feet this amazing Sequoia Table comfortably fits more family, than most find comfortable. But, Matt and Sarah never seem to mind, they will this beauty quite often, With festive friends and family, wonderful food and good company…

Large slab tables begin at $3500…

To The Best of My abilities.

Gustav Stickley and the

American Craftsman Movement.

 

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Me at Craftsman Farms -Gustav Stickley’s home.

 

As I sit typing this from my own “stickley” Table, Lets discuss his influence on American culture and Furniture. Many people are familiar with the term “Craftsman” it invokes of bungalows and Historic neighborhoods, or maybe “Sears craftsman” But, how exactly did it become a movement in Art, Architecture, Design? One so ingrained in American society to be easily recognizable?

 

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Steel inlay carved into my Stickley table.

 

One man did much of the heavy lifting, borrowing from Morris’ British “Arts and Crafts” , Gustav Sickley designed and built fine furniture made by men, not machines. It was intentionally simple, the beauty was in the honesty of materials and joinery. the complexity in the materials and methods, not in “False adornment”. It was real, solid wood, with quality joinery and functional designs.

 

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My very real Stickley table I found in an alley, that led me to instigate “Arts and Crafts” 

 

Stickley  was also responsible for the publication of the iconic “American Craftsman” magazine which along with discussions on the current methods of wood and steel working, design trends and trade discussions. It also featured heavy political discussions of the day, he published works by Anarchist, Socialists and Libertarians. He saw a worker, as a craftsman who created a value and a beauty to society.

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As Stickley was so am I committed to the honesty, and natural beauty of the materials, designs and workmanship. To Truly become an American Craftsman…Life is so short, the craft so long to learn…

Here is an excerpt from Wikipedia to fill in the blanks…

Stickley’s new furniture reflected his ideals of simplicity, honesty in construction, and truth to materials. Unadorned, plain surfaces were enlivened by the careful application of colorants so as not to obscure the grain of the wood and mortise and tenon joinery was exposed to emphasize the structural qualities of the works. Hammered metal hardware, in armor-bright polished iron or patinated copper emphasized the handmade qualities of furniture which was fabricated using both handworking techniques and modern woodworking machinery within Stickley’s Eastwood, New York, factory (now a part of Syracuse, New York). Dyed leather, canvas, terry cloth and other upholstery materials complemented the designs.

Those ideals – simplicity, honesty, truth – were reflected in his trademark, which includes the Flemish phrase Als Ik Kan inside a joiner’s compass. The phrase is generally translated ‘to the best of my ability.’

His firm’s work, both nostalgic in its evocation of handicraft and the pre-industrial era and proto-modern in its functional simplicity, was popularly referred to as being in the Mission style, though Stickley despised the term as misleading. In 1903 he changed the name of his company again, to the Craftsman Workshops, and began a concerted effort to market his works – by then including furniture as well as textiles, lighting, and metalwork – as Craftsman products. Ultimately, over 100 retailers across the United States represented the Craftsman Workshops.

Good Wood Hunting!

Looking for the perfect piece, searching for the perfect piece…

Finding the right wood, whether looking through a dumpster, a wood pile, or some freshly sliced timber — knowing what you are looking at is an art.

Identifying the species, age, growth pattern —  is it Dry? Cured? Kilned? Is it an “Old Growth” tree or Urban Forested?

 

 

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Juniper From Jerome

 

Three main ways I get wood.

ONE

Urban forested: These are yard trees cut down or blown down, which are milled into useable slabs. Usually has one or both live edges.

 

Mesquite-slabs
An Entire Mesquite tree from Sun City
Slabs of Cedar
Himalayan Cedar

Walnut For Barrio Gran Reserva

 

Assorted woods and wood shopping.

TWO

Urban Foraged: Wood found in dumpsters, ally ways, or curbside.

With all the remodels in historic neighborhoods If you are careful you can find some real “Old growth” treasures.

Dumpster score with Miss Bane in Coronado.

In short I use many methods to get the woods I use, but I want them all to be as beautiful and sustainable as possible. Knowing what is useful, what is not, what is firewood, what will not burn.

This entire show was found wood.

THREE

Reclaimed: Found in yards, or online purchased, maybe even from a “barn wood store”

This wood is usually old, either a demolished building, or someone was storing it for quite some time.

Green Goddess house of herbs was all reclaimed wood from a Bar in New River.

 

Old growth Fir “found”

 

Kitchen and bridge in Ghent, NY made of wood found on site.

 

Grand Avenue Pizza Again…

Carson Wheeler, Friend, Pizza maker, and Wood Connoisseur…

Slabs of Cedar
Himalayan Cedar

The premise was simple “A contemporary twist on a picnic table”.  So, we started with two giant slabs of Himalayan Cedar…

Cedar Close up
At 2 1/2 inches thick, this was a massive chunk of wood.

Then I cut one slab in half to make the benches, leaving the second slab intact for the top…

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Next comes the all too familiar X frames with a steel  30-degree take on an old classic.

Pizza Maker
We have a picnic Table

And Carson was happy… The End.

 

 

 

My Story part 1

This week I will start off with something new, something difficult. I will tell my story. In pieces. Kinda like Tarantino it a bit.

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Photo by Niba Delcastillo

Without them I would not be doing what I do today, Building beautiful, sustainable furniture.

Phoenix Public Market

Lets start at the Phoenix Public Market where I learned the importance of sustainability while helping set up “The Community Exchange Table”.  In between checking in/out the produce of local gardeners, small farmers, urban foragers etc., we dug into Permaculture, Sustainability and Community at its very core, and explored how everything we did impacted our environment. Both good and bad.

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Riding up to the market with freshly foraged prickly Pears.

 

Coronado Neighborhood

The burgeoning Coronado neighborhood as community was growing, so were connections, opportunity, and idea. I had stumbled on this gem of a neighborhood while registering people to vote in 2004, only to return in late ’07 and buy a house.  A beautiful neighborhood just outside downtown Phoenix proper, where neighbors are friends and community is strong. With lots of new homes being remodeled I would bike through the alleyways foraging for wood and steel, I would “dumpster dive” and find beautiful hard woods. I even found the Stickley Table that is now in my own living room.

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The Hive.

While volunteering on an art installation at the Shemer Art Center, I connected with a wonderful man I call “yoda”.  Yoda and Julia had an amazing art space on 16th street or as we call it “Calle 16”.  In early 2013 Yoda invited me for a sort of residency where I would tend a Cactus nursery and build some things out of my dumpster scores.  It was a 20’x30′ space that had formerly been the parking lot: no roof, no shade, just an endless supply of time and creativity.  This would be know as “My Chaos” or officially as Zoo Micro Nursery.  Which is where my story begins. 2013 The Hive

Welcome
Welcome To My Chaos

 

 

Tiny Tables Series 5

I am very proud to present Tiny Tables Series 5. William Morris said,”Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.” and I believe Series 5 fits the bill for both.

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New hand made adjuster.

Series 5 represents natural beauty, rebirth, and hope. Its construction is based on a butterfly sculpture I have been working on, and the legs mirror the angles I use for wings. Combined with all repurposed materials, Series 5 will be recreated over-and-over using a variety of materials while keeping the design the same.

Series 5 #1 and #3 feature removable X-ray cartridge tops as well as a handmade adjustor and walnut feet.

Dimensions 11″ x 13″ x 20″ // Price $113

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#2 features solid steel top.

 

Series 5 #2 has a reclaimed steel top, eye bolt adjustor.

Dimensions 14″ x 14″ x 21″ // Price $113

 

“Tiny Tables Series 5— Own Something Beautiful”