Grand Avenue Pizza Again…

Carson Wheeler, Friend, Pizza maker, and Wood Connoisseur…

Slabs of Cedar

Himalayan Cedar

The premise was simple “A contemporary twist on a picnic table”.  So, we started with two giant slabs of Himalayan Cedar…

Cedar Close up

At 2 1/2 inches thick, this was a massive chunk of wood.

Then I cut one slab in half to make the benches, leaving the second slab intact for the top…

IMG_20171105_173641

Next comes the all too familiar X frames with a steel  30-degree take on an old classic.

Pizza Maker

We have a picnic Table

And Carson was happy… The End.

 

 

 

Tiny Tables Series 5

I am very proud to present Tiny Tables Series 5. William Morris said,”Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.” and I believe Series 5 fits the bill for both.

industrialcraftsman_tinytable_adjuster_IMG_1631 copy

New hand made adjuster.

Series 5 represents natural beauty, rebirth, and hope. Its construction is based on a butterfly sculpture I have been working on, and the legs mirror the angles I use for wings. Combined with all repurposed materials, Series 5 will be recreated over-and-over using a variety of materials while keeping the design the same.

Series 5 #1 and #3 feature removable X-ray cartridge tops as well as a handmade adjustor and walnut feet.

Dimensions 11″ x 13″ x 20″ // Price $113

industrialcraftsman_tinytable_502_IMG_1617

#2 features solid steel top.

 

Series 5 #2 has a reclaimed steel top, eye bolt adjustor.

Dimensions 14″ x 14″ x 21″ // Price $113

 

“Tiny Tables Series 5— Own Something Beautiful” 

 

Tiny Tables!!!

Tiny Tables: Beautiful, Simple and Useful.

One of my favorite things about making each piece individually by hand is how different and unique each piece really is. From the materials I am using, to the way I feel, and the designs that are in my head. Each piece is a truly unique experience, and a great way to watch the evolution is through the tiny tables. Let’s look back at the evolution of tiny tables.

These are from the first series of Tiny Tables. Under the ZOO name, this was an original set of ten, built at The Hive Phoenix. Do you have one?

Series two Tiny Tables were slightly larger due to the barn wood I was using at the time. All steel was “Urban Foraged”.  There were originally five in this series, made under the ZOO label, and built at the Hive Phoenix.  Do you have one?

Series three was similar to series one, but were numbered 1-12.

Series four tiny tables were the first under the new ‘Industrial Craftsman Furniture” label, featured a stenciled W on the bottom and were part of a full collection called “Industrial Revolution”.  There were 3 of each piece in this collection, the first collection built at “the cottages”…

This series included 5 pieces and were cut offs from the patio tables I did for the Tempe Buttes Marriott. They were built at the cottages and were the first to feature a carved-W  signature instead of spray paint stencilled.

1462542597761tiny-table-nyc1462469033635IMG_20160504_132712

Two Tiny tables and a saw blade table I built In Ghent NY.

As you can see, over time my style has developed and changed. There are many more “Tiny tables” out there but I do not always get/keep photos. Do you have one? Post a photo.

Building Bridges!

Building Bridges from Phoenix to Brooklyn to Ghent.

In early spring I was Given an opportunity to travel to NYC, no real plans of what to do how to do it. So I packed  some clothes, a few tools and a couple of journals and headed out. This is a long story so I will break it up into a few Blog post, Kinda Tarantino it up a little. So first up will be Ghent, I spent a month working on a small 1840’s farm house where I would Build a bridge, work on a bathroom and try and find a few commissions. It was a large property with a 1840’s farm house, 7 or so out buildings and a stream through the west side. Which brings us to part one…

The Bridge.

The farm was the site of an old water powered saw mill, for the turbine powered mill they had build a sluice way, this created a fork in the stream, which created an “island” that would need a bridge. Using wood left over from when the saw mill was torn down, some found steel water pipes and some new steel I set off to build a bridge. The inspiration was from many places but, mostly a bridge crossing the Hudson near Kinderhook,NY.

Stream and a pile of wood.

Inspiration from Kinderhook,NY

Stream and Matthews studio

Building a bridge on dry land.

The stream and one piece at a time.

The Bridge is set.

Next in the series will be the farm, The Greater Hudson Museum of antiquated Farm equipment at Ghent, Why T is the man, and Industrial Craftsman Furniture East, also Known as Joe’s Garage.

The Buttes!!!

Phoenix Marriott Tempe at The Buttes

Three months ago I was asked to sketch up a few designs for the Buttes and see about building a few new tables for their patio. They liked what I presented. After a few meetings and conversations I started the build out. Working with some local saw mills (and one in Oregon), I set out to find the perfect wood. I chose many varieties: Black Acacia, three types of Mesquite, White Ash, Arizona Elm, Oregon Cottonwood, Maple, Grenadino, and Aleppo Pine. Next, I set out to design the bases, using 1 1/2 and 2″ square tube steel with wood inserts, one adjustable.  I trussed them in four unique ways using some custom iron, antique fence pieces, some bar stock and some unique craftsmanship.  Each table base is its own while following a common theme, so they match without being the same.  For the wood, I used some live edge and free forms, as well as cut some square.  By following the nature in each piece, the tops formed themselves into color and shape, contrast that gives the pieces even more dimension. The rustic, clean look fits well with the modern restaurant architecture set in rocks amidst a cactus garden.  Being given so much artistic freedom this project embodies the Industrial Craftsman style. 

Urban Lumber!

‘What is Urban Lumber?’ you may ask… Think of all the unique and interesting trees people grow here in the Valley. Then think about all the downed trees you see during monsoon season, when someone has to remove a tree because of where it’s growing.  Where do these trees go?  To the dump?  To the mulch or compost farm?  Why not to a local saw mill where they can be turned into lumber?  On my quest for new and different wood for a project, I found three sources of just that, lumber made from trees that grew in the city.  Imagine all the exotic hardwoods you could ever want grown right near home, no more cutting down the rainforest or national park near you, and the hardwoods are amazing.  I found Maple (from Oregon), Arizona Ash, Elm, Cottonwood, Black Acacia, and four types of Mesquite so different in color that it’s hard to believe they were the same type of tree. Talk about sustainable Local, Handmade, furniture built from renewable and beautiful wood.

1447827014177 20151117_115921_HDR 20151117_120159_HDR 20151117_115717 20151117_135659 20151117_142032 20151117_141728 20151117_160340 20151118_120317

About me.

Hi everyone, I’m Bill Hemphill, the Industrial Craftsman.

Every piece of ICF furniture is handbuilt by me in a small studio at my cottage in Downtown Phoenix.

 

The Industrial Craftsman story begins at a time when I was a union carpenter, and as the recession hit, I became a stay-at-home dad with two babies.

While helping a friend on a Micro Dwell (tiny house) concept, I was invited to start a small cactus nursery in the parking lot of his art gallery, known as The Hive. Aside from tending these plants, I built furniture from alley scraps that I found on my way to work. One day while foraging, I came across a unique wood table, it was really old and well built. I discovered it was a Gustav Stickley circa 1910! This led me to study his work, where I found so many themes I could relate to, including— a man should enjoy his work, nature should be valued, and workers are craftsman. Inspired by the clean lines and use of quality materials.

 

So I began to study the turn of the century Craftsman Movement, from Macintosh and William Morris, to Greene and Greene and Stickley. I found myself not only drawn to the design but also to the underlying philosophy of quality, simplicity, craftsmanship and usefulness of each piece. My nursery became more and more a workshop, until it no longer fit my art gallery surroundings. I did some great work and moved my shop to a newfound home at the cottages. I continue to build and study, finding some success. My style began to evolve from furniture of scraps to something that truly resembled the Craftsman Movement. Although while still using repurposed material, it became something different, neither Industrial nor Craftsman, but something in the middle, like “Gustav Stickley with a welder”. That’s how the Industrial Craftsman style was born.

 

We’re at a time and place in the world where we can no longer afford to be wasteful by buying disposable furniture. The Industrial Craftsman Movement is about taking back the craft by putting it in the hands of the worker, while creating a quality product that lasts several lifetimes.

 

My philosophy is to deliver high-quality, custom, handmade furniture that serves the businesses and residents of my community. Because of its simple design and diversity of materials, I can create a beautiful piece to fit any budget. I aspire to have a piece of furniture in every home and business in my neighborhood, and I’m off to a good start.

 

 

 

 

1237163_10151892581071096_300434207_n

297959_10151583706174777_579512841_n

Zoo Micro Nursery

 

1052595_10151714538024777_1369740644_o

Early inlay

1052595_10151714538019777_823223978_o

Early table, Found base, bowling lane top.

 

 

IMG_5419

Early table and cactus planter.

DSCF0233

One of the first “craftsman”inspired tables.

 

nested_ws

Newer Industrial Craftsman style. Complete with signature W.

576816_3266473948745_1425994300_n

The Boys.

35854_423394149776_1651967_n

The boys and I.

 

 

IMG_9850

Much happier me. (photo credit Miss Bane)